books, rants, reviews

Everything Wrong with Wuthering Heights


Hey guys!

I suppose this is a bit of a book review, so here goes.

If I didn’t have to read “Wuthering Heights” for English, I would probably never have read it. I probably would have avoided it at all costs, because it’s not really my thing. In saying that, however, I feel like I’m the type of person who would probably try and read it to prove a point to someone. I don’t know who. But it could happen.

The book is really confusing. There were times when I found it intriguing, and I knew what everyone was talking about, but then all of a sudden Joseph would come in with his strong Yorkshire dialect and that just led me to skip the parts when he was speaking. I couldn’t understand a word.

Now, I know that the book was written a while ago, and times change, and all that jazz, but I still don’t understand the point of Cathy’s decisions. To make the book dramatic? Well, yes. That’s about it. I know that if she chose Heathcliff from the beginning, the book would be over by the end of chapter nine. But no. She chooses Edgar for wealth and status, like any Victorian girl should do, hey?

But any of you who have successfully completed the task of finishing Wuthering Heights will know that there is a lot of death. Those deaths could have been avoided if Cathy just went with her heart rather than marrying Edgar and then trying to make them be friends afterwards. Life doesn’t exactly work like that, when you marry one guy, but your childhood best friend is clearly the one who actually loves you, and therefor is going to have jealousy problems for the rest of his life…

This choice is why Cathy dies. Heathcliff leaves Wuthering Heights for three years, comes back and from what I get from the book, she kind of drives herself to be ill and dies… Later on, Edgar dies. Isabella also dies, and that could have been avoided because if Cathy and Heathcliff stayed together, Isabella wouldn’t have been so stupid to marry someone like Heathcliff, who, by this point, is fueled by jealousy, and then runs away from him. Silly girl.

But let’s not forget Isabella’s son, Linton. Like his uncle, (Edgar) he is weak. Spoiler alert, he dies. It’s bound to happen. And finally, Heathcliff dies. Basically all the main characters die. Oh, sorry. I forgot to say *SPOILER ALERT*.

Death and wrong decisions aren’t the only reasons I don’t like the book. It’s hard to read. Like, really. But a girl’s allowed an opinion, right? So I shall continue.

On my copy of the book, the reviews say how it’s “the most important love story ever”, and it’s “enchanting”, and all of this, but I swear every love story is the “most important” or “most gripping”… I don’t see how Wuthering Heights is much different. Also, love isn’t really the main theme. I mean, it kind of is, but not really? Let’s look at Heathcliff. He loves Cathy to a point where he becomes obsessed with getting his revenge. Love and revenge aren’t exactly the same thing, even though revenge comes from love, in his case. There is proper “love” in it. Like the relationship between young Cathy and Hareton at the end.

Oh, and there’s the other thing. The names. Why on Earth would Bronte want to basically have two characters with the name “Cathy”? You always have to say “Cathy and Young Cathy”, or “Cathy the first/second” and it just gets confusing. But it doesn’t end there. We have Edgar and Isabella Linton. Isabella and Heathcliff have a son. What’s he called? Linton. Linton Heathcliff. As if we weren’t confused enough already, Bronte’s gone and thrown in another name, when she could have just as easily called Linton “George” or “Jim”. The same goes for Young Cathy.

So those are my opinions on Emily Bronte’s “classic”. I know I’m not the first person to argue with it, but I just felt I needed to get that out there and maybe start a few arguments. I don’t know. But I can say that Wuthering Heights is not in my top ten. Sorry…

-The Storyteller

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